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Academic Integrity: Academic Integrity at NSCC

This guide has been created to provide you with quick access to resources on the topic of Academic Integrity.

International Center for Academic Integrity

In its Fundamental Values of Academic Integrity, the International Center for Academic Integrity defines academic integrity as a commitment, even in the face of adversity, to six fundamental values: honesty, trust, fairness, respect, responsibility, and courage.

What is Academic Honesty?

York University. Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. (2020, November 20). What is academic honesty? [Video]. YouTube. https://youtu.be/1Da1Emvd0u8

Acceptable/Unacceptable Use of Information

University of Alberta Dean of Students. (2013, December 8).  Acceptable/unacceptable [Video]. YouTube. https://youtu.be/8Bx5DAqTPhU

NSCC Definitions

Academic Integrity

Students and employees will conduct themselves in an honest and trustworthy manner.

Academic Dishonesty

An intentional, reckless, careless, or improper act for the purpose of obtaining an academic advantage, credential, admission, or credit by deception or fraudulent means. It can include, but is not limited to “cheating”.

Academic File Sharing

The unauthorized distribution of copyrighted course materials, assignment documents, and assessments. Examples include uploading NSCC assignments and assessments to commercial third-party platforms without the instructor's knowledge or permission.

Contract Cheating

The use of assignments and assessments not created or completed by the student (free or purchased) or membership registration with a third-party website (a form of contract) to receive access.

Plagiarism

i) Presenting, in any format, someone else’s ideas, presentations, writing, artistic work, or creations, whether verbal, print, structural, design or electronic, in whole or in part, as one’s own, by failing to credit the source.

ii) The use of material received or purchased from another person, website, or other source or prepared by any person other than the individual claiming to be the author. The use of material received through purchase is also known as “contract cheating.”

iii) Plagiarism can be intentional or occur through carelessness.